The English Otome Guide for Beginners (Part Two: What the heck is an otome game?!)

Welcome to part two of our little tour of Aly’s latest obsession she intends to share like the plague Otome games. Here we will discuss just what we are talking about when we talk about otome games. tumblr_mc5z05MBaB1rzs8suo1_500

(Part One) (Part Three) (Part Four) (Part Five)
Thanks to my fancy research (Wikipedia) I can tell you that in Japanese “乙女ゲーム otome gēmu” translates to literally “girl game”. It’s a term that originated in japan, for a genre of games that still mostly exists in Japan. What exactly qualifies for an otome game, especially an English one, is actually something that people debate. Most people agree that an otome game requires two basic elements: one, its designed for a female audience, and two, it has some sort of romantic element, usually involving a female main character ‘chasing’ or ‘pursuing’ one of many (usually male) romance options and making them their love slave finding a happy ending together.

Give up, you *will* love me by the end of this game.

Give up, you *will* love me by the end of this game.

There are two main sub-genres you will usually find: first visual novels and simulation games (generally when the simulation is specifically about romancing characters, it’s called a romance sim.) Visual novels are pretty much exactly like it sounds like on the box. They have art (usually quite pretty) to represent the characters and the story. The story reads like a novel, but generally offers you choices that impact your story. Generally a basic otome visual novel will have choices that impact whose romance route you end up on and what sort of ending you get. A romance sim has more ‘game’ elements, usually that involve planning how you spend your day and raising stats. They are less linear as a visual novel, but also generally have less written story content. Of course you get plenty of games that merge the two, or only take certain elements from both. Games that are translated into English from their original Japanese usually are usually more cleanly defined as ‘otome’ whereas many of the games made inspired or related to the genre as English-first tend to have more hybrid elements.

What you might look like after trying your first Otome game.

What you might look like after trying your first Otome game.

Of course, the best way to figure out what an otome game is is to play one! (Which is why parts three – five are coming up.) In the meantime, here are a link you might want to check out if you are interested in learning more.

http://www.englishotomegames.net/

It’s a  great site for both news, recommendations, and a supportive, active community.

Until next time,

Keep cool and romance fictional boys(or girls),

-Aly

 

4 responses

  1. Pingback: The English Otome Game Guide for Beginners (Part One: The Backstory) | Aly Thompson HQ

  2. Pingback: The English Otome Game Guide for Beginners Part Five : Recommendations – Handheld | Aly Thompson HQ

  3. Pingback: The English Otome Guide for Beginners Part Three: Recommendations – PC | Aly Thompson HQ

  4. Pingback: The English Otome Game Guide for Beginners Part Four: Recommendations – Mobile | Aly Thompson HQ

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